Pirate Bridge: Scoring Example

First Hand

Alan bids and makes a Spades contract with Mike as acceptor. Spades are worth 9 per trick above book. The contractors get 8 tricks, two above book. 2 x 9 = 18. Alan scores the points below the line as declarer; Mike scores them above the line as acceptor.

Alan Connor Gracie Mike
Bonus Points, Hand 1 0 0 0 18
Game 1, Hand 1 18 0 0 0
Totals 18 0 0 18

Second Hand

Gracie bids and makes a Hearts contract with Mike as acceptor. Hearts are worth 8 per trick above book. The contractors get 8 tricks, two above book. 2 x 8 = 16. Gracie scores the points below the line as declarer; Mike scores them above the line as acceptor.

Note that traditionally, while below-the-line points are added downward, one after the other, above-the-line points are added upwards from the line.  The new entries are in boldface below.

Alan Connor Gracie Mike
Bonus Points, Hand 2 0 0 0 16
Bonus Points, Hand 1 0 0 0 18
Game 1, Hand 1 18 0 0 0
Game 1, Hand 2 0 0 16 0
Totals 18 0 16 34

Third Hand

Alan bids and makes a Hearts contract with Gracie as acceptor. The contractors get 8 tricks, two above book. 2 x 8 = 16. Alan scores the points below the line as declarer; Gracie scores them above the line as acceptor.

Since this brings Alan to 30+ points below the line, he has won the game. Mike and Alan each get 50 more points above the line.

Note that at this point, Mike has the most total points, even though he hasn’t been Declarer for a single hand!

Alan Connor Gracie Mike
Bonus Points, Hand 3 50 0 0 66 (50 game, 16 tricks)
Bonus Points, Hand 2 0 0 0 16
Bonus Points, Hand 1 0 0 0 18
Game 1, Hand 1 18 0 0 0
Game 1, Hand 2 0 0 16 0
Game 1, Hand 3 16
(Alan wins with 34)
0 0 0
Totals 84 0 16 100

Fourth Hand

We draw an additional line below the Game 1 points, to make it clear that a new game has begun.

Connor bids and makes a No-Trump contract with Gracie as acceptor. No-Trump tricks are worth 10 points. The contractors get 9 tricks, three above book. 3 x 10 = 30. Connor scores the points below the line as declarer; Gracie scores them above the line as acceptor.

Since this brings Connor to 30+ points below the line, he has won the second game. Connor and Gracie each get 50 more points above the line.

Alan Connor Gracie Mike
Bonus Points, Hand 4 0 50 80 (50 game, 30 tricks) 0
Bonus Points, Hand 3 50 0 0 66
Bonus Points, Hand 2 0 0 0 16
Bonus Points, Hand 1 0 0 0 18
Game 1, Hand 1 18 0 0 0
Game 1, Hand 2 0 0 16 0
Game 1, Hand 3 16
(Alan wins with 34)
0 0 0
Game 2, Hand 1
(Hand 4 Overall)
0 30
(Connor wins with 30)
0 0
Totals 84 80 96 100

Fifth Hand

Mike bids a 3-Nullo contract with Connor as acceptor. Nullo tricks are worth 10 points. Alan and Gracie take 9 tricks, three above book, so Mike and Connor have completed their 3-Nullo. 3 x 10 = 30. Mike scores the points below the line as declarer; Connor scores them above the line as acceptor.

Since this brings Mike to 30+ points below the line, he has won the third game. Connor and Mike each get 50 more points above the line.

Alan Connor Gracie Mike
Bonus Points, Hand 5 0 80 (50 game, 30 tricks) 0 50
Bonus Points, Hand 4 0 50 80 0
Bonus Points, Hand 3 50 0 0 66
Bonus Points, Hand 2 0 0 0 16
Bonus Points, Hand 1 0 0 0 18
Game 1, Hand 1 18 0 0 0
Game 1, Hand 2 0 0 16 0
Game 1, Hand 3 16
(Alan wins with 34)
0 0 0
Game 2, Hand 1
(Hand 4 Overall)
0 30
(Connor wins with 30)
0 0
Game 3, Hand 1
(Hand 5 Overall)
0 0 0 30
(Mike wins with 30)
Totals 84 160 96 180

Sixth Hand

Alan bids a 3-Nullo contract with Connor as acceptor. Alan and Connor force Mike and Gracie to take 9 tricks, three above book, so Alan and Connor have completed their 3-Nullo. 3 x 10 = 30. Alan scores the points below the line as declarer; Connor scores them above the line as acceptor.

Since this brings Alan to 30+ points below the line, he has won the fourth game. Alan and Connor each get 50 more points above the line.

Since Alan has now won two games, he wins the rubber, and gets an additional 50 points above the line. Connor does not get these additional 50.

Alan Connor Gracie Mike
Bonus Points, Hand 6 100 (50 game, 50 rubber) 80 (50 game, 30 tricks) 0 0
Bonus Points, Hand 5 0 80 0 50
Bonus Points, Hand 4 0 50 80 0
Bonus Points, Hand 3 50 0 0 66
Bonus Points, Hand 2 0 0 0 16
Bonus Points, Hand 1 0 0 0 18
Game 1, Hand 1 18 0 0 0
Game 1, Hand 2 0 0 16 0
Game 1, Hand 3 16
(Alan wins with 34)
0 0 0
Game 2, Hand 1
(Hand 4 Overall)
0 30
(Connor wins with 30)
0 0
Game 3, Hand 1
(Hand 5 Overall)
0 0 0 30
(Mike wins with 30)
Game 4, Hand 1
(Hand 6 Overall)
30
(Alan wins with 30)
0 0 0
Totals 214 240 96 180

And note that even with Alan winning two games and the rubber bonus, Connor actually has the winning score.

Settling Payments

If playing for penny-a-point, you can simply balance each player against the others:

  • Connor owes no one anything, since he was the highest scorer. He collects $0.26 from Alan + $0.60 from Mike + $1.44 from Gracie, for a total of +$2.30.
  • Alan owes Connor $0.26. He collects $0.34 from Mike and $1.18 from Gracie, for a total of +$1.26.
  • Mike owes Alan $0.34 and Connor $0.60, and Gracie owes him $0.84, for a total of -$0.10.
  • Gracie owes Mike $0.84, Alan $1.18, and Connor $1.44, for a total of -$3.46.

The total winnings of those who came out ahead = the total losses of those who came out behind = $3.56. In stating the value of the rubber, since the $3.56 was split by two people, $3.56 / 2 = $1.78, so we say the rubber’s value was $1.78.

Another method is to just round to the nearest dollar; the scores then are: Alan $2, Connor $2, Gracie $1, Mike $2. Gracie owes each of the others $1; none of the others owe each other anything; therefore the total winnings = $3, split among three people, and the value of the rubber is simply $1.

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